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Home / Tips and Tricks / The best way to transfer photos & videos from your DSLR camera to your iPhone «iOS & iPhone :: Gadget Hacks

The best way to transfer photos & videos from your DSLR camera to your iPhone «iOS & iPhone :: Gadget Hacks



If you want to post stunning scenery or a perfect portrait you've just taken with your DSLR camera on Instagram, Facebook, or any other social platform, there's an easy way to do it – even if you do not have it ( 19659002) Even if you're not out and about, you have a good chance that you'll do most of your photo editing on your iPhone or iPad, as there are hundreds of paid and free photo editors and filtering apps in the iOS App Store. First, transfer photos and videos to your computer and then use AirPlay to save them to your iPhone. This is a very complicated process. Plus, you need your computer, and that's clunky.

Most newer Canon, Nikon, and other DSLRs come with Wi-Fi functionality, and when connected, you can connect through your DSLR access point using iPhone Wi-Fi settings. However, you must use the same app from the manufacturer of your camera to display and transfer your photos and videos in this way. Wi-Fi is also not always fast, especially if you record in RAW.

The Best Way Is To Use A Wired Adapter

Wireless is always preferred, but in this case, a wired adapter makes more sense. It's faster, it's tiny, it uses Apple's own import interface and it is imported directly into the Photos app. As far as adapters go, there are three categories that you can choose which Apple sells and which ones you get depends mainly on what type of DSLR you have and only general preference.

Option 1
: Flash to SD Card Camera Reader [19659005] Apple's
Lightning to SD Card Camera Reader connects directly to your iPhone's Lightning port and you plug the SD card into Card of your camera in the reading slot. If you use a point-and-shoot instead of a DSLR, you can use an SD card adapter with your miniSD or microSD card.

This does not work with CompactFlash (CF) cards.

Once the card is inserted, photos will be automatically opened where you can view, download and delete files. For iPhones you get USB 2 data transfer speeds, although some iPad models can get USB 3 speeds.

Apple's Lightning to SD Card Camera Reader, MSRP $ 29 – Purchase of Amazon | Apple | Best Buy

Apple's Lightning on SD Card Camera Reader. Image via Apple

Option 2: Lightning to USB 3 Camera Adapter

Apple's Lightning to USB 3 Camera Adapter connects directly to the Lightning port on your iPhone and plugged in a USB to mini-USB cable into it. This cable would go straight into the mini USB port on your DSLR.

Once you turn on your DSLR, the Photos app will open, allowing you to view, download, and delete files. If you want to use a third-party card reader instead of the camera to read the card, you probably need to connect a power source to the adapter's lightning connector to power the card reader. An advantage of this is that your iPhone is charged at the same time.

For iPhones, you get USB 2 data transfer speeds, although some iPad models can get USB 3 speeds.

Apple's Lightning to USB 3 Camera Adapter, MSRP $ 39 – Buy Amazon | Apple

Apple's Lightning to USB 3 Camera Adapter. Image via Apple

Option 3: Lightning to USB Camera Adapter

Apple's Lightning to USB Camera Adapter connects directly to the Lightning port on your iPhone and you plug in a USB cable , Mini USB cable into it. This cable would go straight into the mini USB port on your DSLR.

Once you turn on your DSLR, the Photos app will open, allowing you to view, download, and delete files. Unlike the above adapter, you will not be able to connect third-party card readers unless they are somehow powered up. For iPhones, you get USB 2 data transfer speeds.

Apple's Lightning to USB Camera Adapter, MSRP $ 29 – Purchase of Amazon | Apple | Best Buy

Apple's Lightning to USB Camera Adapter. Image via Apple

All three of these options require iOS 9 or higher. In addition, each of these adapters supports JPEG, RAW, and other standard photo formats, as well as H.264, MPEG-4, and other SD and HD video formats.

Connecting the Card to Your iPhone

These cables are plug-and-play, unless you are using a third-party card reader. In this case, you need a power source. For the rest of this article, I will use the Lightning to USB Camera Adapter as an example.

After connecting the adapter to my iPhone with a mini USB cable between the adapter and my DSLR, I would just need to turn the camera on to make it a certified card reader. Since my camera uses CompactFlash cards, this is the easiest way for me because the Lightning on SD card camera readers does not accept CompactFlash cards.

Picture by Justin Meyers / Gadget Hacks

Immediately after turning on the camera, the import screen of the Photos app will appear on the iPhone loaded. Depending on how many pictures and videos you have on the card and the format you record them in, the media may load immediately or may take a few seconds. After loading, you can start importing and deleting files.

Import photos and videos into iOS 9 – iOS 11

If you are running iOS 9 on the latest version of iOS 11, the import interface and the options are very pretty bare bones. You will not be able to preview photos in full-screen mode, only the thumbnails you see immediately. Your options are limited to "Import All" or you can tap Photos and Videos just to "import" them.

If you select specific content after If you have clicked on "Import" you need to tap on "Import selection" in the popup, but you can also choose "Import all" if you have changed your mind. Once you have imported them to your iPhone, you can either "delete" the photos from your card or "keep them".

When you try to import all the media After you've already downloaded some pictures or videos from the map, you'll be able to "Duplicate skipping" or simply "Import all," including those already imported.

Import Photos and Videos into iOS 12

As you can see, there are not too many imported photos in iOS 9, iOS 10, and iOS 11, but iOS 12 includes many improvements. If you want to try them out now, you can install iOS 12 either as a developer or public beta tester on your iPhone.

Photos and videos load much faster in the new importer, which makes it easier to see what has already been imported to your iPhone from the "Already imported" card. Apart from that, photos and videos are sorted by date, which makes a nice change if you use your card during the whole week or even a month.

After you click "Import All" the import will start, but you can stop it at any time. If you prefer to select and select media, you can do so as before and tap on the photos and videos you want to download. Then tap on "Import". As before, you can "delete" or "keep" photos and videos on the map after import.

By default, photos and videos are taken in your album "Camera Roll", which is marked in the importer as "Library". However, you can change the destination folder by tapping Import To. You can choose which folder to show in the list, or you can create a new album specifically for this import.

If you can not decide which media should be transferred to your iPhone, the importer of iOS 12 includes a new preview mode. Press firmly to view a picture with 3D Touch, and then press down to zoom in. If you do not have 3D Touch, long press to jump into a large preview. You can then swipe left or right to browse and tap all your photos and videos in the larger view to select or deselect them for import.

Note: iOS 12 is currently in beta always working as expected. For example, as you can see in the screenshots below, it is sometimes difficult to process RAW images for preview. I have it working and not worked before, so hopefully this is something Apple is smoothing out before the stable version of iOS 12.

Obviously, iOS 12 still has a few kinks, like blurry RAW photos.

Once you start importing files, you no longer have to stay on the import screen. It works in the background so you can read your emails, notify someone, check the news, or whatever else you want to do.

Another benefit of iOS 12 for photos is the ability to edit RAW photos. It's not like editing RAW photos on your Mac or PC with Photoshop or Lightroom, but it's a great tool for making quick changes before you publish it on social media or share it in messages. However, RAW image processing is limited to iOS devices with an A9 chip or higher. This means that the iPhone 5S, 6 or 6 Plus will not be RAWed.

If you play any of the imported RAW files on your AirPlay computer, the original RAW format will be preserved. However, if you edit the RAW file in photos, it will instead become a JPEG image, so keep that in mind.

Do not miss: 50+ cool new iOS 12 features you do not know [19659065] Cover picture and screenshots of Justin Meyers / Gadget Hacks


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